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9CT GOLD DIAMOND SET HORSE HEAD PENDANT

Christine Alexander Fine Jewellery


Regular price £365.00
9CT GOLD DIAMOND SET HORSE HEAD PENDANT

A well-made horses head charm/pendant. The pendant is made from 9ct Yellow Gold and is fully hallmarked. It has a good weight to it, at approx. 3.2g and 24mm in length including bale. The horse appears to be mid-neigh, and the angle of the chest gives the impression that he/she is rearing. The overall effect is quite warlike. The neck ends with a line of H colour, I1 clarity Diamonds set in a bright White Gold & Rhodium strip, evoking the neckline of a show rug.  .06cts in total.

An archetypal symbol of animal vitality, velocity and beauty. The mastered horse is a prime symbol of power - hence the popularity of the equestrian statue. They were widely linked with the elemental powers of wind, storm, fire, waves and running water.

The horse’s role as an emblem of the continuity of life is suggested in many rites. In ancient belief, horses knew the mysteries of the underworld, the earth, and its germination cycles. The riderless horse is still used as a poignant symbol in military and state funerals.

Death is usually represented by a black horse - but rides a pale horse in the book of Revelation. The white horse is an emblem of the Buddha (said to have left his earthly life on a white horse), of the Hindu Kalki (the last incarnation of Vishnu), of the merciful Bato Kannon in Japan, and of the Prophet in Islam (for whom horses are emblems of happiness and wealth. As drawn in the chalklands of southern England, the white horse was a Saxon standard, perhaps linked with the Celtic horse-goddess Epona, who was taken into the Roman world as the protectress of horses. Horses draw the chariot of the sun in classical, Iranian, Babylonian, Indian and Norse mythology, and are ridden by many other gods, including Odin, whose eight-legged Mare Sleipnir represents the eight winds.

Although predominantly linked with elemental or instinctual powers, horses can symbolise the speed of thought. They are associated with sexual energy, impetuous desire or lust; as in Fuseli’s painting ‘The Nightmare’ (1781), a fantasy in which a wild-eyed horse thrusts its head through a woman’s bedchamber curtains.

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