rUBY is the birthstone for July and all my Ruby pieces are currently discounted. Also Peridot pieces are a bargain right now (you can get ahead for those August birthdays)! Discount added at checkout. Please message me with any questions!💎💕

9CT GOLD RAINBOW CUBIC ZIRCONIA DROP NECKLACE

Christine Alexander Fine Jewellery


Regular price £250.00
9CT GOLD RAINBOW CUBIC ZIRCONIA DROP NECKLACE

A dear Cubic Zirconia rainbow drop necklace. A 9ct Yellow Gold fine rolo necklace with seven bezel-set circles with different coloured Cubic Zirconia stones spanning the 18"  length. A delightful dainty necklace, great for layering, or to be worn alone.

A LAYAWAY PLAN IS AVAILABLE. My layaway plan is 100% free and you don't have to apply or qualify for it. I simply require a 25-50% deposit then you will have up to six months to pay the remainder of the balance. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly instalment payments are available. You can pick and choose your own payment plan to find an option that works for you. Your order will be shipped to you as soon as it is paid in full. Terms are flexible. Please contact me to initiate. PayPal required. You do not receive the item until fully paid for. See my Policies page for Ts&Cs.

Your purchase will arrive in a luxury recycled box. I will send your purchase via Royal Mail Special Delivery.

Rainbow flags tend to be used as a sign of a new era, of hope, or of social change. In the 1990s, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and President Nelson Mandela described the newly democratic South Africa as the "rainbow nation", also alluding to its diversity and multiculturalism. Rainbow flags have been used in many places over the centuries: as a symbol of the Cooperative movement; to represent the Tawantin Suyu, or Inca territory, mainly in Peru and Bolivia; by the Jewish Autonomous Oblast;  and as a modified symbol of gay pride and LGBTQIA social movements since the 1970s. More recently the rainbow was adopted as a symbol of hope during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially during periods of lockdown. Households worldwide displayed home-made images of rainbows in their windows, often alongside positive messages; in the UK for the NHS.

Cubic zirconia, as a Diamond substituent and jewel competitor, has been seen as a potential solution against conflict Diamonds and the controversy surrounding the rarity and value of Diamonds. This is attributed to confirmed evidence that there were price-fixing practices taken by the major producers of rough Diamonds, in the majority attributed to De Beers Company known as holding a monopoly on the market from the 1870s to early 2000s. However, De Beers and Co do not have as much power over the market, and the price of Diamonds continues to increase due to the increased demand in emerging markets such as India and China. A closely related issue to this monopoly was the emergence of conflict Diamonds. It has been shown that the Kimberley Process is not as effective in decreasing the number of conflict Diamonds reaching the European and American markets as intended. A 2015 study from the Enough Project, showed that groups in the Central African Republic have reaped between US$3 million and US$6 million annually from blood Diamonds. Diamond substituents, therefore, have become an alternative to boycotting altogether the funding of such unethical practices. However, concerns from mining countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo are that a boycott on purchases of Diamonds would only worsen their economy. Therefore, it is argued that in the short term Diamonds substituents could be an alternative to reduce conflict around the market of Diamond mining but a long-term solution would be to establish a more rigorous system of identifying the origin of these stones.

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