15% OFF ALL EMERALD JEWELLERY FOR THE MONTH OF MAY! DISCOUNT ADDED AT CHECKOUT. LAYAWAY AVAILABLE.

9CT WHITE GOLD CUBIC ZIRCONIA DOUBLE HALO CLUSTER STUDS

Christine Alexander Fine Jewellery


Regular price £125.00
9CT WHITE GOLD CUBIC ZIRCONIA DOUBLE HALO CLUSTER STUDS

Sparkling like Diamonds, these Cubic Zirconia stones look even better than many natural gems. Set in 9ct White Gold mounts there is 30 brilliant Cubic Zirconia surrounding 1 larger brilliant-cut stone set in each one. They measure approx. 8mm in diameter, weigh 1.1 grams and have secure butterfly scrolls for safety. They are stamped 9K and 375 with the official stamp of the London assay office. They are all in excellent condition and not pre-owned. 

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White Gold is an alloy of Gold and at least one white metal (usually nickel, Silver, or Palladium). 

White gold's properties vary depending on the metals used and their proportions. The term White Gold is used very loosely in the industry to describe karat Gold alloys with a whitish hue. The term "white" covers a large spectrum of colours that borders or overlaps pale yellow, tinted brown, and even very pale rose. The alloys used in the jewellery industry are Gold–Palladium–Silver and Gold–Nickel–Copper–Zinc. The nickel used in some White Gold alloys can cause an allergic reaction when worn over long periods (also notably on some wristwatch casings). Gold is rarely pure Gold, even before another metal is added to make a White Gold alloy and often contains a mercury alloy from its production, which can cause an allergic reaction. Where possible I source my White Gold from within the EU where the usual mix is the former. It is impossible to know the mix in a preloved or vintage item, sadly; I usually have the item re-plated with Rhodium to minimise any risk. All new White Gold items are enhanced with Rhodium plating. To preserve this plating, avoid swimming in your jewellery as chlorine, in particular, can cause faster degradation. Chlorine is present in small amounts in tap water, so it is best to avoid getting your jewellery wet where possible.  It is a simple matter to have items re-plated.

Cubic zirconia, as a Diamond substituent and jewel competitor, has been seen as a potential solution against conflict Diamonds and the controversy surrounding the rarity and value of Diamonds. This is attributed to confirmed evidence that there were price-fixing practices taken by the major producers of rough Diamonds, in the majority attributed to De Beers Company known as holding a monopoly on the market from the 1870s to early 2000s. However, De Beers and Co do not have as much power over the market, the price of Diamonds continues to increase due to the increased demand in emerging markets such as India and China. A closely related issue to this monopoly was the emergence of conflict Diamonds. It has been shown that the Kimberley Process is not as effective in decreasing the number of conflict Diamonds reaching the European and American markets as intended. A 2015 study from the Enough Project, showed that groups in the Central African Republic have reaped between US$3 million and US$6 million annually from blood Diamonds. Diamond substituents, therefore, have become an alternative to boycotting altogether the funding of such unethical practices. However, concerns from mining countries such as the Democratic Republic of Congo are that a boycott in purchases of Diamonds would only worsen their economy. Therefore, it is argued that in the short term Diamonds substituents could be an alternative to reduce conflict around the market of Diamond mining but a long term solution would be to establish a more rigorous system of identifying the origin of these stones.

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