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9CT GOLD RAINBOW CUBIC ZIRCONIA BAR NECKLACE

Christine Alexander Fine Jewellery


Regular price £195.00
9CT GOLD RAINBOW CUBIC ZIRCONIA BAR NECKLACE

Add a subtle pop of colour to your outfit with this rainbow bar necklace in 9ct Yellow Gold. This simple clean design is perfect for layering with your existing necklaces for that fashionable #neckmess look.

18" in length, the bar is 28.8 x 3.1mm. Fourteen coloured Cubic Zirconia stones represent the seven colours of the rainbow, the pattern repeated. A matching bracelet is also available.

I want to make sure that every purchase feels special, no matter what occasion you are shopping for. Your order will arrive packed beautifully inside a fully recycled Christine Alexander branded box, making it a perfect gift experience for either yourself or your loved one.

A LAYAWAY PLAN IS AVAILABLE. My layaway plan is 100% free and you don't have to apply or qualify for it. I simply require a 25-50% deposit then you will have up to six months to pay the remainder of the balance. Weekly, bi-weekly or monthly instalment payments are available. You can pick and choose your own payment plan to find an option that works for you. Your order will be shipped to you as soon as it is paid in full. Terms are flexible. Please contact me to initiate. PayPal required. You do not receive the item until fully paid for. See my Policies page for Ts&Cs.

A bridging signal between the supernatural and natural worlds, usually optimistic (as meteorologically the rainbow often is). In Greece, the rainbow-goddess Iris, robed in iridescent dew, carried messages to Earth from the supreme god Zeus and his wife Hera. In Tibetan Buddhism, the ‘rainbow body’ is the penultimate transitional state of meditation in which matter begins to be transformed into pure light. As a solar and water emblem, the arc of the rainbow touching the ground usually suggested fertility and treasure - the folklore pot of gold. The rainbow was associated with a serpent in parts of India, Africa, Asia and Native North America, as well as in Australia, and its powers were unpredictable. Hence perhaps, the African and Asian superstition that it is risky or unwise to point at a rainbow.  In western art, Christ sometimes sits in judgement on top of a rainbow, which can also represent the Virgin Mary and the Holy Trinity.

More often, the ladder symbolism of the rainbow is positive. Rainbow flags tend to be used as a sign of a new era, of hope, or of social change. In the 1990s, Archbishop Desmond Tutu and President Nelson Mandela described the newly democratic South Africa as the "rainbow nation", also alluding to its diversity and multiculturalism. Rainbow flags have been used in many places over the centuries: as a symbol of the Cooperative movement; to represent the Tawantin Suyu, or Inca territory, mainly in Peru and Bolivia; by the Jewish Autonomous Oblast;  and as a modified symbol of gay pride and LGBTQIA social movements since the 1970s. More recently the rainbow was adopted as a symbol of hope during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially during periods of lockdown. Households worldwide displayed homemade images of rainbows in their windows, often alongside positive messages; in the UK for the NHS.


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